A Side Hustle Isn’t Only Nice, It’s Necessary

Since January this year I’ve been listening to Chris Gillebeau’s Side Hustle School on my daily commute, walk, bike, etc. It’s a daily podcast with bite-sized stories about people who start an income-generating business while working a day job.

Their tag line is: A side hustle isn’t just nice, it’s necessary.

Chris, by the way, is the author of the The Art of Non-Conformity, and is one of the reasons I decided to leave the Philippines and try living abroad.

From a japanese candy subscription to professional snuggling, the stories are entertaining and inspiring. I try to recommend it to everyone I know who’s looking to earn more income. As an illustrator/visual artist, income can be pretty erratic. So I’ve always had to do other things, be it teaching swimming or being a courtroom sketch artist (more on that later).

Based on the the stories I’ve listened to, I’ve tried:

  • Opening Getty/Shutterstock images account
  • Posting portrait and personalised comic book services here and on Etsy
  • Offering photography, pet-sitting, and massage services on craigslist

None of these have panned out so far. After listening about a man from Florida who made $100,000 from selling t-shirts without any inventory, I thought I’d give the teespring a try. Several times I’ve tried and failed on Threadless, which works on a voting system, which shows that I need to get better at of promoting and designing. With teespring however, there is no voting system, but you do need to meet a minimum purchase order for the shirt to be printed.

So here’s my first design:

I set the limit at 50 orders, and as of this writing, I need 3 more to be able to print.

A friend helped me come up with this one, and I promised to split the profits with her. If you have a tshirt design and want me to create it, send me a message at pinoyartista(at)gmail. The plan is to release 3 designs and see if they move.

The great thing about teespring that sets it apart from all the other tshirt platforms I’ve tried is they give you the option of donating a portion of your sales to several charities. 10% of So Very Sorry sales will go to Reach Out WorldWide which is a network of professionals with first-responder skill sets who augment local efforts during natural disasters.

The challenge is to move quickly, to quickly test different business models and determine which works best in terms of enjoyment and profit.

To date, I’ve been playing the copycat, trying to see which are immediately applicable. Although the best thing would be to come up with an idea that a) is original and b) helps people by making their lives better.

After each episode, Chris signs off with, “Remember, inspiration is good, but inspiration combined with action, is so much better.”

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