Arrival

 

It is a strange feeling, arriving in a foreign country for the first time. It is a process that continues even after you have walked out of the airport, even after you have unpacked your bags, taken your first shower, or have had your first meal.

I arrived in Barcelona airport before noon, and after using the mere 15 minutes of free wifi that they make available to contact my flatmates to get the address of our apartment, I then had to figure out how to get there. My first attempt to board a bus to the city taught me that they do not give change for anything larger than €20, so I had to go back up to the airport to have money changed into smaller denominations.

The weather in Barcelona is optimal for human existence. It was October and you can walk around in a shirt beneath the midday sun and not sweat a drop.

TIP: When arriving in a new country, bring the local currency in smaller denominations. The bus fare from the airport to the city is €5.90, while the regular bus fare within the city is €2.15. Buying a prepaid card as early as possible will save you money right off the bat. For example, a card worth 10 trips costs €10.30 (only €1 per trip), and is valid on the bus, tram, and metro. Multiple swipes within an hour also count as just one trip.

You could, of course, take a taxi, which I’ve learned is quite reasonable, and not cutthroat in their rates (unlike airport taxis in my country). Out of habit, however, I do not take a taxi if I can help it.
My first interaction with the locals was on the plane. Marta and Angela were two ladies who ran a travel agency, Atlantis Mara, and they had just taken a group to Myanmar for several days. So I was quite lucky as they spoke english and suggested places to visit and so on. I chatted with one of their clients about football, and learned that tickets to watch a match in Barcelona Camp Nou costs at least €50, but that there are clubs you can join which gets you a discount.

In the arrival area, there are information centres, banks, money changers, and a surprisingly large number of dogs. I suggest that unless you’re changing large amounts, you can get better rates elsewhere.

Distracted at Plaza España. It’s always better to make your way to your destination before getting into sightseeing.

As usual, I immediately got lost (even back in the Philippines, I have a horrible sense of direction). Despite having consulted at the tourist information booth, I missed my stop and had to take another bus back. Fortunately, there was a tourist information booth here because I couldn’t find the bus stop. Then, after receiving directions, I decided to sightsee for a bit, then proceeded to wait at the wrong bus stop for a bus that never came. I tried asking a few people for directions (all the Spanish phrases one has learned become so much harder to remember when you really need to use them), and was eventually pointed in the right direction by a waiter.

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The youths who man the tourist information centers are the best. They are multilingual and extremely helpful. This guy at Plaza España was way friendly and spoke spanish, catalan, english, and even korean.

TIP: As they tend to stand outside, waiters and shopkeepers are good people to ask for directions. Senior citizens are also happy to help, but one I spoke to completely ignored me after several “Buenos tardeses.” She either had really bad hearing or simply did not want to have anything to do with a FOB like myself. Also, take a cab if it’s not that expensive.

By the time I got to my flat past 3, my shoulders were screaming (my pack weighed around 20kg). I rang the bell, introduced myself to the voice over the intercom, and was let in by a young Spaniard named Jose, who turned out to be the property manager and the son of the owners of the flat.

We rode up on an antique elevator to the fourth floor, and I walked into what would be my home–and to meet the people who were to be my flatmates for the next ten months–for the very first time.


TIP: When looking for long-staying flat rentals in Barcelona, search out sites like JustLandedBCN, AirBNB, or Loquo. Also, don’t ignore ads simply because they don’t have photos. I plan to write a more detailed post about flat hunting in Barcelona in the future.

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